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When we moved to the ranch, we discussed which animals we were interested in caring for; goats were on the short list. When we found out that a local farm was dispersing their herd and looking for a good home for several retirees, we raised our hand to volunteer. Thus began our love affair with the caprine class.

La Mancha doeling goat Continue Reading »

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Honey Harvest

Honey extracted from combs drips into the collection basin

We were sad today to discover that our hand-me-down hive, which we acquired from a friend in early November, had succumbed to the winter weather. While we learned a valuable lesson about hive placement and sheltering from the cold and damp, we also found that we were suddenly in possession of a valuable resource. With our bees all dead, we began extracting the combs, placing them in our overly warm downstairs bathroom. Once the honey had thawed a bit, we began the process of scraping, collecting, and spinning–the result of which is a golden ambrosia. Continue Reading »

Trouble was the matriarch of the  Siskiyou Crest Herd. This article was written by Dana Kristal, and posted in the Siskiyou Crest Herd Share Newsletter in September 2010. Trouble retired to the Lazy T Ranch in October 2011. She continues to prove herself a worthy leader and an incredibly special goat. Here’s her story:

Alpine dairy goat, Trouble

Trouble is a ten year-old Alpine with a beard as long as her dairy career. Continue Reading »

shoveling chicken poop...glamorous!

So, you’re interested in organic farming?

So are we! In an effort to engage a larger community in the projects and daily activities of our ranch, we’ve decided to open our land to members of WWOOF, or World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms. In exploring our options for expansion and exchange, an internship program seemed to rigid and friendly work parties just weren’t consistent enough. WWOOF seemed like a good mid-point, and we’re excited to welcome a volunteer work force to our farm. Continue Reading »

Nestled in a box canyon on the south fork of Anderson Creek in the beautiful Rogue Valley, the Lazy T Ranch is a 2nd-generation forest farm in transition! Run by a fun-loving young couple with a roster of revolving and colorful residents, we practice sustainable forestry, organic and systemic approaches to gardening, and goat-, chicken- and beekeeping.

Our hands are always full and projects are always ongoing as we work to squeeze as much life out of our hundred acre wood as we can! We are as likely to be growing a treehouse (the ranch has a full wood and metal shop) as we are to be planting and sowing vegetables, fruit trees, vines, and tubers throughout the year.

Skills offered include animal care, milking, woodland maintenance, canning, pickling, and laying away food, wildcrafting, building with wood, earth, and found objects, beekeeping, whiskey appreciation, and making a damn fine cup of coffee. Easily accessible from nearby Ashland, we are tech-savvy, cultured folks fluent in English, Spanish, German, and barroom Swahili.

Barnyard Salutations from two of our goats, Trouble and Henny